It was conquered by Ivan the Terrible in 1552 and became the Christian See of the Volga Land.

The only surviving Tatar fortress in Russia and an important place of pilgrimage, the Kazan Kremlin consists of an outstanding group of historic buildings dating from the 16th to 19th centuries, integrating remains of earlier structures of the 10th to 16th centuries.

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The Church of the Ascension was built in 1532 on the imperial estate of Kolomenskoye, near Moscow, to celebrate the birth of the prince who was to become Tsar Ivan IV ('the Terrible').

One of the earliest examples of a traditional wooden tent-roofed church on a stone and brick substructure, it had a great influence on the development of Russian ecclesiastical architecture.

Each year, UNESCO's World Heritage Committee may inscribe new sites on the list, or delist sites that no longer meet the criteria.

Selection is based on ten criteria: six for cultural heritage (i–vi) and four for natural heritage (vii–x).

The convent provides an example of the highest accomplishments of Russian architecture with rich interiors and an important collection of paintings and artefacts.

Built on an ancient site, the Kazan Kremlin dates from the Muslim period of the Golden Horde and the Kazan Khanate.

The architecture of the monastery is outstanding in its inventiveness and purity.

The interior is graced by the magnificent wall paintings of Dionisy, the greatest Russian artist of the end of the 15th century.

The site continued to be of great strategic importance until the 19th century.