It’s important to get the full name as there are ususally subtly different versions.Plus, you should note down the revision number – for example REV 1.03G as it may require a different BIOS file to previous revisions.The easiest way is to look in the user manual of your mainboard.

Insert a floppy disk into your drive and right-click the corresponding drive symbol inside the Windows Explorer (usually A:). Delete all files except Command.com, and from the disk, even those that are invisible.

To do so, enter the Control Panel and click on Folder Options.

Similarly, creating a backup of your BIOS is also a good idea.

Sometimes this will be done automatically as part of the updating process, but if it requires you to do it manually, be sure not to skip this step.

At this point, it's well worth reading any instructions on the manufacturer's website about the exact updating process for your BIOS.

They do vary, and you may need to configure some things before starting the update process, such as disabling secure boot modes and fast boot modes.

Here's everything you need to know about how to update a PC BIOS, whether traditional or the newer UEFI standard.

See also: How to install Windows 7 Before you start, heed this warning: if something goes wrong during the BIOS update, your computer could be rendered useless.

Typically you won't need to as a PC or laptop will be set up to look for a removable disc or drive before trying to boot from the hard drive.

Alternatively, look for a 'Press F10 for boot options' or similar as your computer is starting to bring up a list of drives.

You should be able to search for the model and see a list of available downloads, which might include manuals, drivers and BIOS files.